Dutch duo Homework know how to twist a dusty sample into a…

Posted by Homework on Aug 08, 2012



Dutch duo Homework know how to twist a dusty sample into a dancefloor killer, as heard on everything from their breakthrough ‘Hudson Square’ EP – the title track of which recasts Taana Gardner’s ‘Heartbeat’ – to their latest ‘Conversation Piece’ EP, both released by Shir Khan’s Exploited Records. Their podcast showcases this mixture of classic sounds with a modern sheen, starting with the master, Detroit’s Moodymann, before covering hot new acts like Jordan Peak and Detroit Swindle and long-standing players including Mateo & Matos and Franck Roger, for smooth summer vibes all the way.

1. Moodymann - U Ranaway - Scion A/V
2. Glenn Astro & IMYRMIND - KDIM - Odd Socks
3. Moomin - The Story About You - Smallville
4. Jordan Peak - Got Soul - Morris Audio
5. Homework - Confessing - 2020Vision
6. Mateo & Matos - Maw Basics (Gerd’s NY Stomp Mix) - Local Talk
7. Detroit Swindle - Jick Rames - Dirt Crew
8. Germano Kuerten - Love Transistions (Urulu’s I Can Taste Summer Mix) - Moonsol
9. Rodriguez Jr. - Muppet Anthem - Mobilee
10. Glimpse & Martin Dawson - Fat Controller - Hypercolour
11. Douglas Greed feat. Less & Gjaezon - Resist - International Deejay Gigolo
12. Franck Roger - Spread Love - Circus Company
13. Tiger Stripes - This Man (Adana Twins’ Thursday Disco Vox Remix) - Get Physical
14. Andre Crom & Martin Dawson - Back Into The Future (Flashmob Remix) - Exploited
15. Homework - C’Mon (Start Moving) - 2020Vision

“Shelley Alexis Duvall (born July 7, 1949) is an American…

Posted by Homework on Jul 18, 2012



“Shelley Alexis Duvall (born July 7, 1949) is an American actress, best known for her acting roles in the films Thieves Like Us, 3 Women, The Shining and Popeye.

She began her career in the 1970s films of Robert Altman, followed by roles in films by Woody Allen, Stanley Kubrick, Terry Gilliam and Tim Burton. She is also an Emmy-nominated producer, responsible for Faerie Tale Theatre and other kid-friendly programming.”

Waist.

“Vincent Gallo may be best known as an actor in such cult…

Posted by Homework on Jun 28, 2012



“Vincent Gallo may be best known as an actor in such cult movies as Buffalo 66 (for which he also served as director and writer), but he’s also issued several albums over the years, both as a solo artist and as a member of such obscure outfits as Bohack. Born on April 11, 1962, in Buffalo, NY, Gallo began playing guitar in garage bands during the early ’70s, during which time he developed an appreciation of both prog rock and proto-punk bands. Gallo did time in such obscure Buffalo-based outfits as the Blue Mood, Zephyr (no relation to the late-’60s rock band of the same name), and the Plastics, before relocating to New York City at the age of 16, and forming a group with soon-to-be renowned artist Jean Michel Basquiat called Gray. Although the group played regularly at such N.Y.C. hot spots as Max’s Kansas City, CBGB’s, Hurrahs, and the Mudd Club, the group split up before any recordings could be made. Gallo found himself as part of such further outfits during the early ’80s, including the one-man band the Nonsexuals, the rap duo Trouble Deuce, and the aforementioned Bohack; the latter being Gallo’s first project to issue an album, 1983’s It Took Several Wives.

Upon the group’s split-up shortly thereafter, Gallo turned his back on a musical career, and focused primarily on acting in movies; landing steady work as either an actor, director, or composer. After including several of his own original compositions on 1998’s Buffalo 66 soundtrack, Gallo decided to give a musical career another shot, forming the group Bunny with guitarist Lucas Haas. Despite a successful Japanese tour and a debut album completed for Sony (with renowned Yes producer Eddie Offord overseeing the recording), the group split up, resulting in the shelving of the debut’s release. After relocating to Los Angeles, Gallo began laying down solo demos at his home recording studio, which attracted the attention of Warp Records. The early 21st century saw the release of such critically acclaimed solo Gallo full-lengths as 2001’s When and 2002’s Recordings of Music for Film.”

Waist.

Coming soon to a record store near you…

Posted by Homework on Jun 28, 2012



Coming soon to a record store near you…

Waist.

Posted by Homework on Jun 27, 2012



Waist.

“One of the dance figures whose influence and exposure far…

Posted by Homework on Jun 20, 2012



“One of the dance figures whose influence and exposure far exceeds his actual name recognition, Walter Gibbons pioneered the concept of the remix and 12” single in America. Influenced by Jamaican dub producers, Gibbons began altering tracks for his DJ sets in the early ’70s, then took his innovations to the studio and recorded the first commercially available remix singles. He started his career as a DJ, and became one of the most popular mixers in New York by the early ’70s. Gibbons began working for Salsoul Records in 1976, and recorded his first remix singles that year, Double Exposure’s “Ten Percent” and the Salsoul Orchestra’s “Nice ‘n’ Nasty.” Utterly transformed with the addition of echo/reverb effects borrowed from dub and drum breaks, the singles influenced dozens of producers (and DJs).

As well, the tracks’ influence hardly ended away from the dancefloor. Released on the 12” vinyl format at a cheap price, they became incredibly popular and soon spurred other labels (including the majors) to begin releasing their own 12” remix singles as well. Gibbons also worked on tracks for West End and Gold Mind during the late ’70s, but was inactive for several years. He returned in 1984 with his most seminal record yet, a classic on New York’s growing garage scene known as “Set It Off.” Gibbons’ original soon became the “Roxanne, Roxanne” of the garage community, swamped by dozens of remakes and answer tracks, including versions by C. Sharp, Masquerade, Number 1, and Strafe (the latter is undoubtedly the most heard and definitive). He also remixed a 1986 Arthur Russell single for Sleeping Bag, Indian Ocean’s “School Bell/Tree House,” but later left the recording industry altogether. He passed away in 1994, a victim of AIDS-related symptoms. Years later, he had his remixes compiled on the three-disc Mixed with Love (2004), which focused on his work for Salsoul, and the wider-scoped two-disc Jungle Music (2010).”

Waist.

“Best known for its 1979 hit “Glide,” Pleasure…

Posted by Homework on Jun 20, 2012



“Best known for its 1979 hit “Glide,” Pleasure was a risk-taking, horn driven band that often brought jazz overtones to its funk/soul foundation. Pleasure, which shouldn’t be confused with the ’90s rock band Pleasure, wasn’t huge but enjoyed a small cult following. The band was formed in Portland, OR, in 1972, when guitarist Marlon “The Magician” McClain (born August 8, 1955), lead singer Sherman Davis (born March 15, 1952), and keyboardist Donald Hepburn (born June 30, 1950) joined forces with saxophonist Dennis Springer (born July 21, 1949), bassist Nathaniel Phillips (born December 30, 1955), trombonist Dan Brewster and drummer Bruce Carter (born December 28, 1956). Pleasure was a merger of two Portland outfits: Franchise (which included McClain, Phillips, and Carter) and the Soul Masters (which was Hepburn’s band and also included Springer, Smith, and Davis). The Oregon residents got a lucky break when trombonist Wayne Henderson, a founding member of the Jazz Crusaders, saw them performing in a Portland club — Henderson was impressed with what he heard, and his enthusiasm led to a deal with Fantasy (where he produced four of its six albums) in 1974. Pleasure’s debut album, Dust Yourself Off, came out on Fantasy in 1975 and was followed by Accept No Substitutes in 1976 and Joyous in 1977. After Joyous, there were a few personnel changes: Brewster left the band, and Donald Hepburn’s younger brother Michael (born May 21, 1953) came on board as a keyboardist/lead singer. Get to the Feeling, Pleasure’s fourth album, came out in 1978 and was followed by 1979’s Future Now, which contained the hit “Glide.” Pleasure’s cult following really swore by the band, but it wasn’t until “Glide” (which reached number ten on Billboard’s R&B singles chart) that the funksters finally scored a Top 10 hit. Trumpeter/flugelhornist Tony Collins (born May 16, 1957) was added to the lineup for Future Now, and Doug Lewis came on board as a lead guitarist for 1980’s Special Things, which was Pleasure’s sixth and final album. Unfortunately, Pleasure didn’t have any more major hits after “Glide,” and in 1981, the band broke up.”

Waist.



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